How to showcase your project on GitHub
Uploading and storing your code on GitHub is not enough to razzle and dazzle recruiters, your classmates, or even your mom.
Here is how to impress people with your GitHub repository. It all begins with your README.md file.
Your code does not explain your code. You need words and visuals

Adding a GIF of your project to your README

  1. 1.
    The first step is to download LICEcap a free screen capture software for Windows and Mac which save as a .GIF.
2. The second step is to add the GIF that you created with LICEcap in Step 1 and upload it to your GitHub repository.
3 After you have committed the GIF file to your repository, click the pencil icon on the top right of your README.md
4. Now it's magic time, we will now add some special markdown that will allow you to insert the GIF we committed in step three into our README.
![](name-of-giphy.gif)
5. The final step is to commit the file changes to your README file.

Here is a GIF on how to add a GIF to a README.md file

Be A Wordsmith

Add a description of your project to demonstrate your written communication skills.

Host Your Website Live

After uploading your project to Github you can host your website live so recruiters can view it. Sites like Vercel, Netlify, and Heroku will allow you to host your website for others to view and test.

A checklist for your GitHub project repository

Your GitHub repository should satisfy the following checklist:
  • An assignment submission must have at least 4 git commits with messages. The more the better, as long as it makes sense.
  • Commit messages should be written in the imperative mood.
  • Each commit should leave the code in a working state.
  • Must include a README file with a 3-5 sentence description of the project.
  • Must include a GIF of your project in action embedded in your README.
  • Must include a link to your live website.

Example of a real Lehman's student's awesome repository

Here is a GIF